Community Climate Action Plan

Share Community Climate Action Plan on Facebook Share Community Climate Action Plan on Twitter Share Community Climate Action Plan on Linkedin Email Community Climate Action Plan link

Bridge over butterfly shaped garden with trees in backgroundThe City of Stratford is currently developing its net zero plan: the Community Climate Action Plan.

This plan will guide Stratford in its collective efforts to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2030, and achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

Stratford’s climate action efforts consist of more than just reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The goal is to make Stratford a more livable, connected, and healthy community. In order to get to carbon neutrality, we all need to work together.

Public engagement activities held April-June 2023 helped us to develop a set of actions and strategies in several key areas:

  • buildings and land use
  • energy
  • transportation
  • waste and circular economy
  • natural assets and ecosystems
  • tourism and industry

We would like your feedback on these identified actions and strategies, available in the Documents section at right, as we continue to develop an action-oriented, made-in-Stratford Community Climate Action Plan.

Input can be provided using the Comments section below, and will be received until August 22, 2023.

Bridge over butterfly shaped garden with trees in backgroundThe City of Stratford is currently developing its net zero plan: the Community Climate Action Plan.

This plan will guide Stratford in its collective efforts to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2030, and achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

Stratford’s climate action efforts consist of more than just reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The goal is to make Stratford a more livable, connected, and healthy community. In order to get to carbon neutrality, we all need to work together.

Public engagement activities held April-June 2023 helped us to develop a set of actions and strategies in several key areas:

  • buildings and land use
  • energy
  • transportation
  • waste and circular economy
  • natural assets and ecosystems
  • tourism and industry

We would like your feedback on these identified actions and strategies, available in the Documents section at right, as we continue to develop an action-oriented, made-in-Stratford Community Climate Action Plan.

Input can be provided using the Comments section below, and will be received until August 22, 2023.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Based on community input received so far, we have identified a set of actions and strategies for the Community Climate Action Plan. Please give us your feedback on these actions and strategies. If you have a question about them, please post it here, and we will do our best to answer it.

  • Share Hello Sadaf. You've presented a list of actionable measures for Stratford to promote sustainability and combat climate change. Many of these measures, when implemented properly, can lead to both short-term and long-term positive environmental impacts. Let's delve a little deeper into some of my suggestions/comments: Making Public Transit Efficient: It's true that some public buses are underutilized, which can lead to inefficiency in terms of fuel and resources. Measures can be taken to optimize routes, use hybrid or electric buses (possibly hydrogen) , and implement flexible schedules based on demand. Bicycle-Friendly City: Designing a city to be more bike-friendly can significantly reduce car usage, promoting both health and environmental benefits. One-Way Streets with Bike Lanes: Converting secondary two-way streets into one-way can simplify traffic patterns and often provide enough space for safe bike lanes without major infrastructural changes. Bike Parking & Storage: Ensure there's enough infrastructure like bike racks, bike storage, and possibly even bike repair stations. Awareness and Education: Campaigns to make motorists more aware of cyclists can reduce accidents and make cycling more appealing. Green Bins in Apartments: Large apartment complexes often generate significant waste. Implementing composting via green bins can divert a large fraction of waste from landfills, reducing methane emissions and promoting organic recycling. Tree Planting Initiatives: Trees are natural carbon sinks. Collaborating with community partners like Rotary, to plant trees can help in carbon sequestration and also provides shade, and promotes biodiversity. Working with organizations like Rotary ensures that there's both funding and manpower to execute such projects. Community Gardens and Pollinator Projects: Community Gardens: They not only provide local, fresh produce but also help reduce the carbon footprint associated with transporting food. They also promote community cohesion and resilience. Pollinator Projects: Initiatives that promote habitats for pollinators like bees, butterflies, and birds can be invaluable for local ecosystems and agriculture. Electric Vehicle Charging: Level 3 Charging Stations: These are fast chargers that can provide an 80% charge in 30 minutes to an hour. While they're more expensive, they promote the use of electric vehicles by making charging convenient and quick. In my opinion Level 2 for public charging just doesn't make sense. Overall, the measures you've listed in your "Community Climate Action Plan' are practical, actionable, and can have a profound impact on a community's carbon footprint. However, their success often depends on proper execution, community engagement, and continuous evaluation for improvements. on Facebook Share Hello Sadaf. You've presented a list of actionable measures for Stratford to promote sustainability and combat climate change. Many of these measures, when implemented properly, can lead to both short-term and long-term positive environmental impacts. Let's delve a little deeper into some of my suggestions/comments: Making Public Transit Efficient: It's true that some public buses are underutilized, which can lead to inefficiency in terms of fuel and resources. Measures can be taken to optimize routes, use hybrid or electric buses (possibly hydrogen) , and implement flexible schedules based on demand. Bicycle-Friendly City: Designing a city to be more bike-friendly can significantly reduce car usage, promoting both health and environmental benefits. One-Way Streets with Bike Lanes: Converting secondary two-way streets into one-way can simplify traffic patterns and often provide enough space for safe bike lanes without major infrastructural changes. Bike Parking & Storage: Ensure there's enough infrastructure like bike racks, bike storage, and possibly even bike repair stations. Awareness and Education: Campaigns to make motorists more aware of cyclists can reduce accidents and make cycling more appealing. Green Bins in Apartments: Large apartment complexes often generate significant waste. Implementing composting via green bins can divert a large fraction of waste from landfills, reducing methane emissions and promoting organic recycling. Tree Planting Initiatives: Trees are natural carbon sinks. Collaborating with community partners like Rotary, to plant trees can help in carbon sequestration and also provides shade, and promotes biodiversity. Working with organizations like Rotary ensures that there's both funding and manpower to execute such projects. Community Gardens and Pollinator Projects: Community Gardens: They not only provide local, fresh produce but also help reduce the carbon footprint associated with transporting food. They also promote community cohesion and resilience. Pollinator Projects: Initiatives that promote habitats for pollinators like bees, butterflies, and birds can be invaluable for local ecosystems and agriculture. Electric Vehicle Charging: Level 3 Charging Stations: These are fast chargers that can provide an 80% charge in 30 minutes to an hour. While they're more expensive, they promote the use of electric vehicles by making charging convenient and quick. In my opinion Level 2 for public charging just doesn't make sense. Overall, the measures you've listed in your "Community Climate Action Plan' are practical, actionable, and can have a profound impact on a community's carbon footprint. However, their success often depends on proper execution, community engagement, and continuous evaluation for improvements. on Twitter Share Hello Sadaf. You've presented a list of actionable measures for Stratford to promote sustainability and combat climate change. Many of these measures, when implemented properly, can lead to both short-term and long-term positive environmental impacts. Let's delve a little deeper into some of my suggestions/comments: Making Public Transit Efficient: It's true that some public buses are underutilized, which can lead to inefficiency in terms of fuel and resources. Measures can be taken to optimize routes, use hybrid or electric buses (possibly hydrogen) , and implement flexible schedules based on demand. Bicycle-Friendly City: Designing a city to be more bike-friendly can significantly reduce car usage, promoting both health and environmental benefits. One-Way Streets with Bike Lanes: Converting secondary two-way streets into one-way can simplify traffic patterns and often provide enough space for safe bike lanes without major infrastructural changes. Bike Parking & Storage: Ensure there's enough infrastructure like bike racks, bike storage, and possibly even bike repair stations. Awareness and Education: Campaigns to make motorists more aware of cyclists can reduce accidents and make cycling more appealing. Green Bins in Apartments: Large apartment complexes often generate significant waste. Implementing composting via green bins can divert a large fraction of waste from landfills, reducing methane emissions and promoting organic recycling. Tree Planting Initiatives: Trees are natural carbon sinks. Collaborating with community partners like Rotary, to plant trees can help in carbon sequestration and also provides shade, and promotes biodiversity. Working with organizations like Rotary ensures that there's both funding and manpower to execute such projects. Community Gardens and Pollinator Projects: Community Gardens: They not only provide local, fresh produce but also help reduce the carbon footprint associated with transporting food. They also promote community cohesion and resilience. Pollinator Projects: Initiatives that promote habitats for pollinators like bees, butterflies, and birds can be invaluable for local ecosystems and agriculture. Electric Vehicle Charging: Level 3 Charging Stations: These are fast chargers that can provide an 80% charge in 30 minutes to an hour. While they're more expensive, they promote the use of electric vehicles by making charging convenient and quick. In my opinion Level 2 for public charging just doesn't make sense. Overall, the measures you've listed in your "Community Climate Action Plan' are practical, actionable, and can have a profound impact on a community's carbon footprint. However, their success often depends on proper execution, community engagement, and continuous evaluation for improvements. on Linkedin Email Hello Sadaf. You've presented a list of actionable measures for Stratford to promote sustainability and combat climate change. Many of these measures, when implemented properly, can lead to both short-term and long-term positive environmental impacts. Let's delve a little deeper into some of my suggestions/comments: Making Public Transit Efficient: It's true that some public buses are underutilized, which can lead to inefficiency in terms of fuel and resources. Measures can be taken to optimize routes, use hybrid or electric buses (possibly hydrogen) , and implement flexible schedules based on demand. Bicycle-Friendly City: Designing a city to be more bike-friendly can significantly reduce car usage, promoting both health and environmental benefits. One-Way Streets with Bike Lanes: Converting secondary two-way streets into one-way can simplify traffic patterns and often provide enough space for safe bike lanes without major infrastructural changes. Bike Parking & Storage: Ensure there's enough infrastructure like bike racks, bike storage, and possibly even bike repair stations. Awareness and Education: Campaigns to make motorists more aware of cyclists can reduce accidents and make cycling more appealing. Green Bins in Apartments: Large apartment complexes often generate significant waste. Implementing composting via green bins can divert a large fraction of waste from landfills, reducing methane emissions and promoting organic recycling. Tree Planting Initiatives: Trees are natural carbon sinks. Collaborating with community partners like Rotary, to plant trees can help in carbon sequestration and also provides shade, and promotes biodiversity. Working with organizations like Rotary ensures that there's both funding and manpower to execute such projects. Community Gardens and Pollinator Projects: Community Gardens: They not only provide local, fresh produce but also help reduce the carbon footprint associated with transporting food. They also promote community cohesion and resilience. Pollinator Projects: Initiatives that promote habitats for pollinators like bees, butterflies, and birds can be invaluable for local ecosystems and agriculture. Electric Vehicle Charging: Level 3 Charging Stations: These are fast chargers that can provide an 80% charge in 30 minutes to an hour. While they're more expensive, they promote the use of electric vehicles by making charging convenient and quick. In my opinion Level 2 for public charging just doesn't make sense. Overall, the measures you've listed in your "Community Climate Action Plan' are practical, actionable, and can have a profound impact on a community's carbon footprint. However, their success often depends on proper execution, community engagement, and continuous evaluation for improvements. link

    Hello Sadaf. You've presented a list of actionable measures for Stratford to promote sustainability and combat climate change. Many of these measures, when implemented properly, can lead to both short-term and long-term positive environmental impacts. Let's delve a little deeper into some of my suggestions/comments: Making Public Transit Efficient: It's true that some public buses are underutilized, which can lead to inefficiency in terms of fuel and resources. Measures can be taken to optimize routes, use hybrid or electric buses (possibly hydrogen) , and implement flexible schedules based on demand. Bicycle-Friendly City: Designing a city to be more bike-friendly can significantly reduce car usage, promoting both health and environmental benefits. One-Way Streets with Bike Lanes: Converting secondary two-way streets into one-way can simplify traffic patterns and often provide enough space for safe bike lanes without major infrastructural changes. Bike Parking & Storage: Ensure there's enough infrastructure like bike racks, bike storage, and possibly even bike repair stations. Awareness and Education: Campaigns to make motorists more aware of cyclists can reduce accidents and make cycling more appealing. Green Bins in Apartments: Large apartment complexes often generate significant waste. Implementing composting via green bins can divert a large fraction of waste from landfills, reducing methane emissions and promoting organic recycling. Tree Planting Initiatives: Trees are natural carbon sinks. Collaborating with community partners like Rotary, to plant trees can help in carbon sequestration and also provides shade, and promotes biodiversity. Working with organizations like Rotary ensures that there's both funding and manpower to execute such projects. Community Gardens and Pollinator Projects: Community Gardens: They not only provide local, fresh produce but also help reduce the carbon footprint associated with transporting food. They also promote community cohesion and resilience. Pollinator Projects: Initiatives that promote habitats for pollinators like bees, butterflies, and birds can be invaluable for local ecosystems and agriculture. Electric Vehicle Charging: Level 3 Charging Stations: These are fast chargers that can provide an 80% charge in 30 minutes to an hour. While they're more expensive, they promote the use of electric vehicles by making charging convenient and quick. In my opinion Level 2 for public charging just doesn't make sense. Overall, the measures you've listed in your "Community Climate Action Plan' are practical, actionable, and can have a profound impact on a community's carbon footprint. However, their success often depends on proper execution, community engagement, and continuous evaluation for improvements.

    Peter Maranger asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and suggestions.

  • Share This is a great document with many desirable initiatives. Here are some of my suggestions: Buildings & Land Use-more greenspace (parkland) needs to be incorporated into new complete neighbourhood in official plan. Is there a way to make any new builds in the city as close to net zero as possible? Energy-can we have Festival Hydro/local media remind people to turn off air conditioning systems when outside temperatures are in low 20's. So many home air conditioners running all summer even in very temperate weather when not needed. In terms of phasing out fossil fuels, offer people a rebate when they switch from gas powered yard equipment to battery power. To divert construction waste; could the city require a plan to salvage & repurpose existing materials before demolition/renovations are permitted? Natural Assets & Ecosystems-city could reach out to industries, commercial sites where space exists for trees in order to find new areas to plant. Naturalization/native tree areas are a wonderful idea, but need a plan for ongoing monitoring and maintenance to ensure desirable plants get a chance to grow and weeds and invasive plants don't take hold. These areas can't be left to fend for themselves until well-established; even then routine monitoring for issues is needed. Green infrastructure on private lands-so many new concrete driveways are being put in by residents, yet concrete is a major source of greenhouse gases. Can the city inform residents through PSAs or on website of better options or offer rebates or tax incentives for residents that put in permeable hardscape. This would help mitigate flooding potential, & overburdening the sewer systems from runoff from properties on Facebook Share This is a great document with many desirable initiatives. Here are some of my suggestions: Buildings & Land Use-more greenspace (parkland) needs to be incorporated into new complete neighbourhood in official plan. Is there a way to make any new builds in the city as close to net zero as possible? Energy-can we have Festival Hydro/local media remind people to turn off air conditioning systems when outside temperatures are in low 20's. So many home air conditioners running all summer even in very temperate weather when not needed. In terms of phasing out fossil fuels, offer people a rebate when they switch from gas powered yard equipment to battery power. To divert construction waste; could the city require a plan to salvage & repurpose existing materials before demolition/renovations are permitted? Natural Assets & Ecosystems-city could reach out to industries, commercial sites where space exists for trees in order to find new areas to plant. Naturalization/native tree areas are a wonderful idea, but need a plan for ongoing monitoring and maintenance to ensure desirable plants get a chance to grow and weeds and invasive plants don't take hold. These areas can't be left to fend for themselves until well-established; even then routine monitoring for issues is needed. Green infrastructure on private lands-so many new concrete driveways are being put in by residents, yet concrete is a major source of greenhouse gases. Can the city inform residents through PSAs or on website of better options or offer rebates or tax incentives for residents that put in permeable hardscape. This would help mitigate flooding potential, & overburdening the sewer systems from runoff from properties on Twitter Share This is a great document with many desirable initiatives. Here are some of my suggestions: Buildings & Land Use-more greenspace (parkland) needs to be incorporated into new complete neighbourhood in official plan. Is there a way to make any new builds in the city as close to net zero as possible? Energy-can we have Festival Hydro/local media remind people to turn off air conditioning systems when outside temperatures are in low 20's. So many home air conditioners running all summer even in very temperate weather when not needed. In terms of phasing out fossil fuels, offer people a rebate when they switch from gas powered yard equipment to battery power. To divert construction waste; could the city require a plan to salvage & repurpose existing materials before demolition/renovations are permitted? Natural Assets & Ecosystems-city could reach out to industries, commercial sites where space exists for trees in order to find new areas to plant. Naturalization/native tree areas are a wonderful idea, but need a plan for ongoing monitoring and maintenance to ensure desirable plants get a chance to grow and weeds and invasive plants don't take hold. These areas can't be left to fend for themselves until well-established; even then routine monitoring for issues is needed. Green infrastructure on private lands-so many new concrete driveways are being put in by residents, yet concrete is a major source of greenhouse gases. Can the city inform residents through PSAs or on website of better options or offer rebates or tax incentives for residents that put in permeable hardscape. This would help mitigate flooding potential, & overburdening the sewer systems from runoff from properties on Linkedin Email This is a great document with many desirable initiatives. Here are some of my suggestions: Buildings & Land Use-more greenspace (parkland) needs to be incorporated into new complete neighbourhood in official plan. Is there a way to make any new builds in the city as close to net zero as possible? Energy-can we have Festival Hydro/local media remind people to turn off air conditioning systems when outside temperatures are in low 20's. So many home air conditioners running all summer even in very temperate weather when not needed. In terms of phasing out fossil fuels, offer people a rebate when they switch from gas powered yard equipment to battery power. To divert construction waste; could the city require a plan to salvage & repurpose existing materials before demolition/renovations are permitted? Natural Assets & Ecosystems-city could reach out to industries, commercial sites where space exists for trees in order to find new areas to plant. Naturalization/native tree areas are a wonderful idea, but need a plan for ongoing monitoring and maintenance to ensure desirable plants get a chance to grow and weeds and invasive plants don't take hold. These areas can't be left to fend for themselves until well-established; even then routine monitoring for issues is needed. Green infrastructure on private lands-so many new concrete driveways are being put in by residents, yet concrete is a major source of greenhouse gases. Can the city inform residents through PSAs or on website of better options or offer rebates or tax incentives for residents that put in permeable hardscape. This would help mitigate flooding potential, & overburdening the sewer systems from runoff from properties link

    This is a great document with many desirable initiatives. Here are some of my suggestions: Buildings & Land Use-more greenspace (parkland) needs to be incorporated into new complete neighbourhood in official plan. Is there a way to make any new builds in the city as close to net zero as possible? Energy-can we have Festival Hydro/local media remind people to turn off air conditioning systems when outside temperatures are in low 20's. So many home air conditioners running all summer even in very temperate weather when not needed. In terms of phasing out fossil fuels, offer people a rebate when they switch from gas powered yard equipment to battery power. To divert construction waste; could the city require a plan to salvage & repurpose existing materials before demolition/renovations are permitted? Natural Assets & Ecosystems-city could reach out to industries, commercial sites where space exists for trees in order to find new areas to plant. Naturalization/native tree areas are a wonderful idea, but need a plan for ongoing monitoring and maintenance to ensure desirable plants get a chance to grow and weeds and invasive plants don't take hold. These areas can't be left to fend for themselves until well-established; even then routine monitoring for issues is needed. Green infrastructure on private lands-so many new concrete driveways are being put in by residents, yet concrete is a major source of greenhouse gases. Can the city inform residents through PSAs or on website of better options or offer rebates or tax incentives for residents that put in permeable hardscape. This would help mitigate flooding potential, & overburdening the sewer systems from runoff from properties

    Maria Koch asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your suggestions.

  • Share This comprehensive list is an excellent starting point. These are all admirable goals. What I would also like to see is some guidance as to strategy. Our climate plan will be prioritizing these goals, and we need more information to make a recommendation. How expensive are these objectives? Can we compare the amount of greenhouse gas will be avoided by each action? How will we coordinate these actions? What obstacles will we face in implementation? Which goals, essentially, are the most important? We need to be able to see the goals of the “What we heard” list within a framework that helps us determine priorities, if we are to give a meaningful response. However, I do have some comments: Buildings and Land use: I believe that walkable, complete, and compact neighbourhoods are a number 1 priority for Stratford. Reviewing the Zoning Bylaw: this idea might gain more support if it were explained in more detail. Can you give an example of the barriers? Can you give an example of how energy efficiency would be incentivized? Unless I know that, my response is uninformed. Innovative programs and financing for retrofits would definitely be second on my list of priorities. Again, more detail on how these goals would be met might elicit more enthusiasm from respondents. Better systems and standards are also a good thing; however, I don’t understand how the City can collaborate with developers on net-zero strategies. Are there any mechanisms left for collaboration? Are there any controls left for municipalities to deal with developers? More detail here would allow me to make an informed response. Energy: What kind of demand management strategies would be implemented? Here again, more detail would allow respondents to give an informed response. Could you also give examples of the potential programs that Festival Hydro might offer residents? Resources and education on energy conservation is always a good thing, and good that you mention the City’s participation in reducing emissions. GEOTHERMAL: although expensive, this has the potential for long-term financial stability for our City. A short discussion here of possible projects would help respondents see the possibilities. Could a geothermal component work in the new Cooper site? What about that huge parking lot at the Rotary Complex? Transportation: These are all fine goals, particularly the EV charging stations. I’m interested to know whether EV stations could bring income to City coffers. Why is there no mention of free public transportation? This is an option in many climate change plans. Waste: Again, these are all fine goals, although in this slide I would like to see an assessment of the relative GHG reductions these actions would bring. I would suspect that such an assessment would reveal that waste reduction should be very high on our list of priorities. Natural Assets and Ecosystems: Good goals; I would add that our urban forest has an unhealthy percentage of male trees. Male trees are planted because they are easier to manage, but they cause a higher pollen count and a higher asthma rate among our residents. I would also add that fruit and nut trees should not be left out of consideration. Community gardens should be specifically named in this section as something the City should support. Tourism: Your first point, “showcase leadership,” might be strengthened by indicating that a publicity campaign about a greener Stratford might bring increased tourist dollars to support these actions. on Facebook Share This comprehensive list is an excellent starting point. These are all admirable goals. What I would also like to see is some guidance as to strategy. Our climate plan will be prioritizing these goals, and we need more information to make a recommendation. How expensive are these objectives? Can we compare the amount of greenhouse gas will be avoided by each action? How will we coordinate these actions? What obstacles will we face in implementation? Which goals, essentially, are the most important? We need to be able to see the goals of the “What we heard” list within a framework that helps us determine priorities, if we are to give a meaningful response. However, I do have some comments: Buildings and Land use: I believe that walkable, complete, and compact neighbourhoods are a number 1 priority for Stratford. Reviewing the Zoning Bylaw: this idea might gain more support if it were explained in more detail. Can you give an example of the barriers? Can you give an example of how energy efficiency would be incentivized? Unless I know that, my response is uninformed. Innovative programs and financing for retrofits would definitely be second on my list of priorities. Again, more detail on how these goals would be met might elicit more enthusiasm from respondents. Better systems and standards are also a good thing; however, I don’t understand how the City can collaborate with developers on net-zero strategies. Are there any mechanisms left for collaboration? Are there any controls left for municipalities to deal with developers? More detail here would allow me to make an informed response. Energy: What kind of demand management strategies would be implemented? Here again, more detail would allow respondents to give an informed response. Could you also give examples of the potential programs that Festival Hydro might offer residents? Resources and education on energy conservation is always a good thing, and good that you mention the City’s participation in reducing emissions. GEOTHERMAL: although expensive, this has the potential for long-term financial stability for our City. A short discussion here of possible projects would help respondents see the possibilities. Could a geothermal component work in the new Cooper site? What about that huge parking lot at the Rotary Complex? Transportation: These are all fine goals, particularly the EV charging stations. I’m interested to know whether EV stations could bring income to City coffers. Why is there no mention of free public transportation? This is an option in many climate change plans. Waste: Again, these are all fine goals, although in this slide I would like to see an assessment of the relative GHG reductions these actions would bring. I would suspect that such an assessment would reveal that waste reduction should be very high on our list of priorities. Natural Assets and Ecosystems: Good goals; I would add that our urban forest has an unhealthy percentage of male trees. Male trees are planted because they are easier to manage, but they cause a higher pollen count and a higher asthma rate among our residents. I would also add that fruit and nut trees should not be left out of consideration. Community gardens should be specifically named in this section as something the City should support. Tourism: Your first point, “showcase leadership,” might be strengthened by indicating that a publicity campaign about a greener Stratford might bring increased tourist dollars to support these actions. on Twitter Share This comprehensive list is an excellent starting point. These are all admirable goals. What I would also like to see is some guidance as to strategy. Our climate plan will be prioritizing these goals, and we need more information to make a recommendation. How expensive are these objectives? Can we compare the amount of greenhouse gas will be avoided by each action? How will we coordinate these actions? What obstacles will we face in implementation? Which goals, essentially, are the most important? We need to be able to see the goals of the “What we heard” list within a framework that helps us determine priorities, if we are to give a meaningful response. However, I do have some comments: Buildings and Land use: I believe that walkable, complete, and compact neighbourhoods are a number 1 priority for Stratford. Reviewing the Zoning Bylaw: this idea might gain more support if it were explained in more detail. Can you give an example of the barriers? Can you give an example of how energy efficiency would be incentivized? Unless I know that, my response is uninformed. Innovative programs and financing for retrofits would definitely be second on my list of priorities. Again, more detail on how these goals would be met might elicit more enthusiasm from respondents. Better systems and standards are also a good thing; however, I don’t understand how the City can collaborate with developers on net-zero strategies. Are there any mechanisms left for collaboration? Are there any controls left for municipalities to deal with developers? More detail here would allow me to make an informed response. Energy: What kind of demand management strategies would be implemented? Here again, more detail would allow respondents to give an informed response. Could you also give examples of the potential programs that Festival Hydro might offer residents? Resources and education on energy conservation is always a good thing, and good that you mention the City’s participation in reducing emissions. GEOTHERMAL: although expensive, this has the potential for long-term financial stability for our City. A short discussion here of possible projects would help respondents see the possibilities. Could a geothermal component work in the new Cooper site? What about that huge parking lot at the Rotary Complex? Transportation: These are all fine goals, particularly the EV charging stations. I’m interested to know whether EV stations could bring income to City coffers. Why is there no mention of free public transportation? This is an option in many climate change plans. Waste: Again, these are all fine goals, although in this slide I would like to see an assessment of the relative GHG reductions these actions would bring. I would suspect that such an assessment would reveal that waste reduction should be very high on our list of priorities. Natural Assets and Ecosystems: Good goals; I would add that our urban forest has an unhealthy percentage of male trees. Male trees are planted because they are easier to manage, but they cause a higher pollen count and a higher asthma rate among our residents. I would also add that fruit and nut trees should not be left out of consideration. Community gardens should be specifically named in this section as something the City should support. Tourism: Your first point, “showcase leadership,” might be strengthened by indicating that a publicity campaign about a greener Stratford might bring increased tourist dollars to support these actions. on Linkedin Email This comprehensive list is an excellent starting point. These are all admirable goals. What I would also like to see is some guidance as to strategy. Our climate plan will be prioritizing these goals, and we need more information to make a recommendation. How expensive are these objectives? Can we compare the amount of greenhouse gas will be avoided by each action? How will we coordinate these actions? What obstacles will we face in implementation? Which goals, essentially, are the most important? We need to be able to see the goals of the “What we heard” list within a framework that helps us determine priorities, if we are to give a meaningful response. However, I do have some comments: Buildings and Land use: I believe that walkable, complete, and compact neighbourhoods are a number 1 priority for Stratford. Reviewing the Zoning Bylaw: this idea might gain more support if it were explained in more detail. Can you give an example of the barriers? Can you give an example of how energy efficiency would be incentivized? Unless I know that, my response is uninformed. Innovative programs and financing for retrofits would definitely be second on my list of priorities. Again, more detail on how these goals would be met might elicit more enthusiasm from respondents. Better systems and standards are also a good thing; however, I don’t understand how the City can collaborate with developers on net-zero strategies. Are there any mechanisms left for collaboration? Are there any controls left for municipalities to deal with developers? More detail here would allow me to make an informed response. Energy: What kind of demand management strategies would be implemented? Here again, more detail would allow respondents to give an informed response. Could you also give examples of the potential programs that Festival Hydro might offer residents? Resources and education on energy conservation is always a good thing, and good that you mention the City’s participation in reducing emissions. GEOTHERMAL: although expensive, this has the potential for long-term financial stability for our City. A short discussion here of possible projects would help respondents see the possibilities. Could a geothermal component work in the new Cooper site? What about that huge parking lot at the Rotary Complex? Transportation: These are all fine goals, particularly the EV charging stations. I’m interested to know whether EV stations could bring income to City coffers. Why is there no mention of free public transportation? This is an option in many climate change plans. Waste: Again, these are all fine goals, although in this slide I would like to see an assessment of the relative GHG reductions these actions would bring. I would suspect that such an assessment would reveal that waste reduction should be very high on our list of priorities. Natural Assets and Ecosystems: Good goals; I would add that our urban forest has an unhealthy percentage of male trees. Male trees are planted because they are easier to manage, but they cause a higher pollen count and a higher asthma rate among our residents. I would also add that fruit and nut trees should not be left out of consideration. Community gardens should be specifically named in this section as something the City should support. Tourism: Your first point, “showcase leadership,” might be strengthened by indicating that a publicity campaign about a greener Stratford might bring increased tourist dollars to support these actions. link

    This comprehensive list is an excellent starting point. These are all admirable goals. What I would also like to see is some guidance as to strategy. Our climate plan will be prioritizing these goals, and we need more information to make a recommendation. How expensive are these objectives? Can we compare the amount of greenhouse gas will be avoided by each action? How will we coordinate these actions? What obstacles will we face in implementation? Which goals, essentially, are the most important? We need to be able to see the goals of the “What we heard” list within a framework that helps us determine priorities, if we are to give a meaningful response. However, I do have some comments: Buildings and Land use: I believe that walkable, complete, and compact neighbourhoods are a number 1 priority for Stratford. Reviewing the Zoning Bylaw: this idea might gain more support if it were explained in more detail. Can you give an example of the barriers? Can you give an example of how energy efficiency would be incentivized? Unless I know that, my response is uninformed. Innovative programs and financing for retrofits would definitely be second on my list of priorities. Again, more detail on how these goals would be met might elicit more enthusiasm from respondents. Better systems and standards are also a good thing; however, I don’t understand how the City can collaborate with developers on net-zero strategies. Are there any mechanisms left for collaboration? Are there any controls left for municipalities to deal with developers? More detail here would allow me to make an informed response. Energy: What kind of demand management strategies would be implemented? Here again, more detail would allow respondents to give an informed response. Could you also give examples of the potential programs that Festival Hydro might offer residents? Resources and education on energy conservation is always a good thing, and good that you mention the City’s participation in reducing emissions. GEOTHERMAL: although expensive, this has the potential for long-term financial stability for our City. A short discussion here of possible projects would help respondents see the possibilities. Could a geothermal component work in the new Cooper site? What about that huge parking lot at the Rotary Complex? Transportation: These are all fine goals, particularly the EV charging stations. I’m interested to know whether EV stations could bring income to City coffers. Why is there no mention of free public transportation? This is an option in many climate change plans. Waste: Again, these are all fine goals, although in this slide I would like to see an assessment of the relative GHG reductions these actions would bring. I would suspect that such an assessment would reveal that waste reduction should be very high on our list of priorities. Natural Assets and Ecosystems: Good goals; I would add that our urban forest has an unhealthy percentage of male trees. Male trees are planted because they are easier to manage, but they cause a higher pollen count and a higher asthma rate among our residents. I would also add that fruit and nut trees should not be left out of consideration. Community gardens should be specifically named in this section as something the City should support. Tourism: Your first point, “showcase leadership,” might be strengthened by indicating that a publicity campaign about a greener Stratford might bring increased tourist dollars to support these actions.

    Sharon asked 11 months ago

    Thanks for your comments. The identified action items and strategies were informed by input from the community, as well as best practices from other Canadian municipalities. The goal is to incorporate as many as possible, where feasible, into the Community Climate Action Plan. 

  • Share No mention of free public transportation in this plan, or even a reduction in transportation fees. This is central to reducing our GHG's. The amount of our tax money that goes to public transportation is miniscule in comparison with what we spend on maintaining roads for cars. The public should be made aware of this, and the importance and prevalence of automobiles must be reduced. A more active approach by the City in lobbying for better train service would complement a free or reduced fare system; free transportation plans that include tourism would be a plus for the entire city, and if publicized would show Stratford to be an eco-friendly tourist destination. on Facebook Share No mention of free public transportation in this plan, or even a reduction in transportation fees. This is central to reducing our GHG's. The amount of our tax money that goes to public transportation is miniscule in comparison with what we spend on maintaining roads for cars. The public should be made aware of this, and the importance and prevalence of automobiles must be reduced. A more active approach by the City in lobbying for better train service would complement a free or reduced fare system; free transportation plans that include tourism would be a plus for the entire city, and if publicized would show Stratford to be an eco-friendly tourist destination. on Twitter Share No mention of free public transportation in this plan, or even a reduction in transportation fees. This is central to reducing our GHG's. The amount of our tax money that goes to public transportation is miniscule in comparison with what we spend on maintaining roads for cars. The public should be made aware of this, and the importance and prevalence of automobiles must be reduced. A more active approach by the City in lobbying for better train service would complement a free or reduced fare system; free transportation plans that include tourism would be a plus for the entire city, and if publicized would show Stratford to be an eco-friendly tourist destination. on Linkedin Email No mention of free public transportation in this plan, or even a reduction in transportation fees. This is central to reducing our GHG's. The amount of our tax money that goes to public transportation is miniscule in comparison with what we spend on maintaining roads for cars. The public should be made aware of this, and the importance and prevalence of automobiles must be reduced. A more active approach by the City in lobbying for better train service would complement a free or reduced fare system; free transportation plans that include tourism would be a plus for the entire city, and if publicized would show Stratford to be an eco-friendly tourist destination. link

    No mention of free public transportation in this plan, or even a reduction in transportation fees. This is central to reducing our GHG's. The amount of our tax money that goes to public transportation is miniscule in comparison with what we spend on maintaining roads for cars. The public should be made aware of this, and the importance and prevalence of automobiles must be reduced. A more active approach by the City in lobbying for better train service would complement a free or reduced fare system; free transportation plans that include tourism would be a plus for the entire city, and if publicized would show Stratford to be an eco-friendly tourist destination.

    Richard Green asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your input.

  • Share "• Explore opportunities to develop and implement waste programs in multi-unit residential buildings." This is imperative - there are so many condo groups that pay taxes to the city but get no garbage services and that includes no green bin pickup. I do not understand why city garbage pick up cannot be extended to these complexes - even if it required negotiating some kind of contract with the corporations. This is only going to become a larger issue with all the new townhouse complexes going up in the McCarthy area. on Facebook Share "• Explore opportunities to develop and implement waste programs in multi-unit residential buildings." This is imperative - there are so many condo groups that pay taxes to the city but get no garbage services and that includes no green bin pickup. I do not understand why city garbage pick up cannot be extended to these complexes - even if it required negotiating some kind of contract with the corporations. This is only going to become a larger issue with all the new townhouse complexes going up in the McCarthy area. on Twitter Share "• Explore opportunities to develop and implement waste programs in multi-unit residential buildings." This is imperative - there are so many condo groups that pay taxes to the city but get no garbage services and that includes no green bin pickup. I do not understand why city garbage pick up cannot be extended to these complexes - even if it required negotiating some kind of contract with the corporations. This is only going to become a larger issue with all the new townhouse complexes going up in the McCarthy area. on Linkedin Email "• Explore opportunities to develop and implement waste programs in multi-unit residential buildings." This is imperative - there are so many condo groups that pay taxes to the city but get no garbage services and that includes no green bin pickup. I do not understand why city garbage pick up cannot be extended to these complexes - even if it required negotiating some kind of contract with the corporations. This is only going to become a larger issue with all the new townhouse complexes going up in the McCarthy area. link

    "• Explore opportunities to develop and implement waste programs in multi-unit residential buildings." This is imperative - there are so many condo groups that pay taxes to the city but get no garbage services and that includes no green bin pickup. I do not understand why city garbage pick up cannot be extended to these complexes - even if it required negotiating some kind of contract with the corporations. This is only going to become a larger issue with all the new townhouse complexes going up in the McCarthy area.

    Green Concerned asked 11 months ago

    Thanks for your comments. We are reaching out to multi-residential building owners in an effort to expand our green bin program. Please note that some condo complexes make their own arrangements for waste pickup.

  • Share I would like to suggest that Garbage pick up on residential streets happen only on one side so that the truck makes one pass to pick-up bins instead of doing two passes. there are many advantages besides co2 emissions. The pick-up should happen on the "No Parking" side of the street. on Facebook Share I would like to suggest that Garbage pick up on residential streets happen only on one side so that the truck makes one pass to pick-up bins instead of doing two passes. there are many advantages besides co2 emissions. The pick-up should happen on the "No Parking" side of the street. on Twitter Share I would like to suggest that Garbage pick up on residential streets happen only on one side so that the truck makes one pass to pick-up bins instead of doing two passes. there are many advantages besides co2 emissions. The pick-up should happen on the "No Parking" side of the street. on Linkedin Email I would like to suggest that Garbage pick up on residential streets happen only on one side so that the truck makes one pass to pick-up bins instead of doing two passes. there are many advantages besides co2 emissions. The pick-up should happen on the "No Parking" side of the street. link

    I would like to suggest that Garbage pick up on residential streets happen only on one side so that the truck makes one pass to pick-up bins instead of doing two passes. there are many advantages besides co2 emissions. The pick-up should happen on the "No Parking" side of the street.

    Donald Denis Murphy asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for the suggestion.

  • Share Observations: The city could be involved in the seeding and creation of a renewable energy cooperative, so that residents were able to mutually invest in home retrofits (successful examples in Ottawa, Edmonton and Toronto could be scaled for Stratford) The Official Plan Review is an opportunity to establish new renewable energy guidelines and standards beyond the built environment; prioritizing geothermal and sustainable infrastructure would be a great start! We can expedite the electrification of our transit fleet, as indicated in the recent feasibility study and limit procurement of any new city vehicles to hybrid or ZEVs. on Facebook Share Observations: The city could be involved in the seeding and creation of a renewable energy cooperative, so that residents were able to mutually invest in home retrofits (successful examples in Ottawa, Edmonton and Toronto could be scaled for Stratford) The Official Plan Review is an opportunity to establish new renewable energy guidelines and standards beyond the built environment; prioritizing geothermal and sustainable infrastructure would be a great start! We can expedite the electrification of our transit fleet, as indicated in the recent feasibility study and limit procurement of any new city vehicles to hybrid or ZEVs. on Twitter Share Observations: The city could be involved in the seeding and creation of a renewable energy cooperative, so that residents were able to mutually invest in home retrofits (successful examples in Ottawa, Edmonton and Toronto could be scaled for Stratford) The Official Plan Review is an opportunity to establish new renewable energy guidelines and standards beyond the built environment; prioritizing geothermal and sustainable infrastructure would be a great start! We can expedite the electrification of our transit fleet, as indicated in the recent feasibility study and limit procurement of any new city vehicles to hybrid or ZEVs. on Linkedin Email Observations: The city could be involved in the seeding and creation of a renewable energy cooperative, so that residents were able to mutually invest in home retrofits (successful examples in Ottawa, Edmonton and Toronto could be scaled for Stratford) The Official Plan Review is an opportunity to establish new renewable energy guidelines and standards beyond the built environment; prioritizing geothermal and sustainable infrastructure would be a great start! We can expedite the electrification of our transit fleet, as indicated in the recent feasibility study and limit procurement of any new city vehicles to hybrid or ZEVs. link

    Observations: The city could be involved in the seeding and creation of a renewable energy cooperative, so that residents were able to mutually invest in home retrofits (successful examples in Ottawa, Edmonton and Toronto could be scaled for Stratford) The Official Plan Review is an opportunity to establish new renewable energy guidelines and standards beyond the built environment; prioritizing geothermal and sustainable infrastructure would be a great start! We can expedite the electrification of our transit fleet, as indicated in the recent feasibility study and limit procurement of any new city vehicles to hybrid or ZEVs.

    geoff.krauter asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your input and observations.

  • Share It is really important that we understand that Climate solutions at the municipal level support a healthier city and citizenry. I believe that this plan has done that in many ways. We must protect our natural environment, reduce our carbon economy, and create carbon alternatives for the people of Stratford, such as electric, public and especially active transportation systems. The ideas presented within the document highlight many wonderful areas of focus for the city to improve the lives of our citizens, and to better empower both the city and residents to address the climate crisis within our city. Please prioritize change! Scary...maybe, necessary, absolutely! on Facebook Share It is really important that we understand that Climate solutions at the municipal level support a healthier city and citizenry. I believe that this plan has done that in many ways. We must protect our natural environment, reduce our carbon economy, and create carbon alternatives for the people of Stratford, such as electric, public and especially active transportation systems. The ideas presented within the document highlight many wonderful areas of focus for the city to improve the lives of our citizens, and to better empower both the city and residents to address the climate crisis within our city. Please prioritize change! Scary...maybe, necessary, absolutely! on Twitter Share It is really important that we understand that Climate solutions at the municipal level support a healthier city and citizenry. I believe that this plan has done that in many ways. We must protect our natural environment, reduce our carbon economy, and create carbon alternatives for the people of Stratford, such as electric, public and especially active transportation systems. The ideas presented within the document highlight many wonderful areas of focus for the city to improve the lives of our citizens, and to better empower both the city and residents to address the climate crisis within our city. Please prioritize change! Scary...maybe, necessary, absolutely! on Linkedin Email It is really important that we understand that Climate solutions at the municipal level support a healthier city and citizenry. I believe that this plan has done that in many ways. We must protect our natural environment, reduce our carbon economy, and create carbon alternatives for the people of Stratford, such as electric, public and especially active transportation systems. The ideas presented within the document highlight many wonderful areas of focus for the city to improve the lives of our citizens, and to better empower both the city and residents to address the climate crisis within our city. Please prioritize change! Scary...maybe, necessary, absolutely! link

    It is really important that we understand that Climate solutions at the municipal level support a healthier city and citizenry. I believe that this plan has done that in many ways. We must protect our natural environment, reduce our carbon economy, and create carbon alternatives for the people of Stratford, such as electric, public and especially active transportation systems. The ideas presented within the document highlight many wonderful areas of focus for the city to improve the lives of our citizens, and to better empower both the city and residents to address the climate crisis within our city. Please prioritize change! Scary...maybe, necessary, absolutely!

    ianforstratford asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your comments.

  • Share If the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we should put up an air quality sensor that the community can check. People have been checking websites like Airnow.gov and Purpleair a lot this year, to see local air quality monitoring stations, to know when they can open their windows because of the wildfire smoke. But Stratford is in a data desert - the nearest air quality sensors to us are Kitchener, London, and Grand Bend, and local PM2.5 amounts can vary significantly. If Stratford purchased an air quality sensor with taxpayer money, Stratford residents would be able to see first-hand the effects of any greenhouse gas emission reduction initiatives, as well as knowing about the current wildfire smoke situation. on Facebook Share If the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we should put up an air quality sensor that the community can check. People have been checking websites like Airnow.gov and Purpleair a lot this year, to see local air quality monitoring stations, to know when they can open their windows because of the wildfire smoke. But Stratford is in a data desert - the nearest air quality sensors to us are Kitchener, London, and Grand Bend, and local PM2.5 amounts can vary significantly. If Stratford purchased an air quality sensor with taxpayer money, Stratford residents would be able to see first-hand the effects of any greenhouse gas emission reduction initiatives, as well as knowing about the current wildfire smoke situation. on Twitter Share If the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we should put up an air quality sensor that the community can check. People have been checking websites like Airnow.gov and Purpleair a lot this year, to see local air quality monitoring stations, to know when they can open their windows because of the wildfire smoke. But Stratford is in a data desert - the nearest air quality sensors to us are Kitchener, London, and Grand Bend, and local PM2.5 amounts can vary significantly. If Stratford purchased an air quality sensor with taxpayer money, Stratford residents would be able to see first-hand the effects of any greenhouse gas emission reduction initiatives, as well as knowing about the current wildfire smoke situation. on Linkedin Email If the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we should put up an air quality sensor that the community can check. People have been checking websites like Airnow.gov and Purpleair a lot this year, to see local air quality monitoring stations, to know when they can open their windows because of the wildfire smoke. But Stratford is in a data desert - the nearest air quality sensors to us are Kitchener, London, and Grand Bend, and local PM2.5 amounts can vary significantly. If Stratford purchased an air quality sensor with taxpayer money, Stratford residents would be able to see first-hand the effects of any greenhouse gas emission reduction initiatives, as well as knowing about the current wildfire smoke situation. link

    If the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we should put up an air quality sensor that the community can check. People have been checking websites like Airnow.gov and Purpleair a lot this year, to see local air quality monitoring stations, to know when they can open their windows because of the wildfire smoke. But Stratford is in a data desert - the nearest air quality sensors to us are Kitchener, London, and Grand Bend, and local PM2.5 amounts can vary significantly. If Stratford purchased an air quality sensor with taxpayer money, Stratford residents would be able to see first-hand the effects of any greenhouse gas emission reduction initiatives, as well as knowing about the current wildfire smoke situation.

    moeburn asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your input. We rely on Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) data provided by Environment and Climate Change Canada, including weather and air quality alerts. 

    Air quality monitoring is a provincial service led by the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks. Ontario has a network of 39 Air Quality Monitoring Stations across the province, which collect real-time air pollution data and are posted on the airqualityontario.com website every hour, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

    As you noted, the nearest air quality monitoring stations are in Kitchener, London and Grand Bend. You can also get AQHI readings from recorded telephone messages by dialing 1-800-387-7768 (toll-free).

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or the impact of carbon reduction initiatives city-wide cannot be tracked using air quality sensors. City-wide GHG inventories and related measurements rely heavily on software, data analytics and estimates of emission generation from various sectors, a function that typical air quality sensors are not designed to perform.

  • Share Great actions suggested - lots of potential re: waste management - increase ICI waste diversion, new diversion projects like mattress recycling and expand green bins! on Facebook Share Great actions suggested - lots of potential re: waste management - increase ICI waste diversion, new diversion projects like mattress recycling and expand green bins! on Twitter Share Great actions suggested - lots of potential re: waste management - increase ICI waste diversion, new diversion projects like mattress recycling and expand green bins! on Linkedin Email Great actions suggested - lots of potential re: waste management - increase ICI waste diversion, new diversion projects like mattress recycling and expand green bins! link

    Great actions suggested - lots of potential re: waste management - increase ICI waste diversion, new diversion projects like mattress recycling and expand green bins!

    Emily C asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback.

Page last updated: 21 Jun 2024, 03:08 PM